Noni Super Fruit

Noni has been used for more than 2000 years by native Polynesians for its amazing health and energy benefits. A Tongan legend notes that the God Maui was restored to life by placing Noni leaves all over his body. The applications of the Noni plant are wide ranging – everything from food, medicine and even as a clothing dye. It has also been used in many other cultures for centuries. Like Aloe Vera, kelp and other botanicals the extract of the noni plant has been demonstrated to improve a wide range of health conditions. Noni is widely accepted as being an excellent traditional medicine giving the plant credibility without scientific research(1).

Noni can help many ailments and has been used traditionally by many cultures. Noni is now becoming more accepted by health professionals and is backed by some very compelling research. To conclude these are some of the functions Noni has:

  • Noni helps cells regenerate and function more normally.
  • Noni may prevent development of various disorders and works optimally in conjunction with other antioxidants.
  • It is effective against fungus and parasites.
  • Noni is effective against several harmful bacteria.
  • It is a natural antiseptic.
  • Noni appear to retard tumour growth by stimulating the immune system.
  • It has an analgesic effect.
  • It arrests the growth of RAS cancerous cells when implanted1,2,3,4,5,6

Dr Ralph Heinicke is the world’s most famous researcher of Noni. He has spent over 45 years studying the effects of an alkaloid he discovered and named Xeronine. Xeronine has very important physiological functions and its precursor proxeronine is highest in the Noni plant. Proxeronine has a limited store in the liver to send to damaged or unbalanced cells, so consuming Noni is a great way to provide this precursor for body stores to be converted to Xeronine when needed[1],[2].

Xeronine is seen as essential for cell functions.  Xeronine acts on protein and increases the energy needed for mechanical, chemical and electrical work in each cell.  Because of xeronine’s function on proteins it explains why Noni has a wide range of applications in the human body[1].

Serotonin and Proxeroninase as shown in the diagram are critical part of the Xeronine system. Proxeroninase is a lysozyme enzyme[1].

By consuming Noni it helps our body normalise the function of damaged and sick cells thereby facilitating their repair by delivering proxeronine, the cells then assemble into the alkaloid Xeronine. Xeronine affects the cells positively making you “feel healthier”. This healing action of Xeronine is an adaptogen, it goes to places in the body where cell function is abnormal or damaged[1].

It was summarised by Heinicke that the documented benefits of Noni could be used for a wide range of ailments from high blood pressure, menstrual cramps, arthritis, gastric ulcers, sprains, injuries, mental depression, senility, poor digestion, atherosclerosis, blood vessel problems, drug addiction, help relieve pain and many others[1][2].

Scientific evidence backs up many of Heinicke’s claims and even proves many more uses for Noni.

Noni has antibacterial functions and promotes expulsion of mucus and the shrinkage of swollen membranes making it an excellent therapy for nasal congestion, lung infections and haemorrhoids [2]. This antibacterial function of Noni has been proven to destroy and ward off infections from several types of bacteria.  It is not suggested that Noni replace antibiotics but it may aid in removal of dangerous bacteria in conjunction with more traditional medicines such as antibiotics[1],[2].

Scopoletin is a phytonutrient constituent of Noni. It acts upon constricted blood vessels and dilates then; this means that if a person has high blood pressure then Noni may help in dropping it to a level that results in less damage to the heart.  Scopoletin was isolated in 1993 by the University of Hawaii and has been studied by many universities around the world. One university conducted a study and found that Noni did lower blood pressure in those who had slightly raised blood pressure. It has not been found to decrease blood pressure below normal but acts on the body to normalise it[1].

There are at least 140 constituents of Noni that act synergistically together and with other foods and medicines to maximise effects, and decrease side effects[1].

A study was conducted by the University of Hawaii and was conducted on laboratory mice (C57BL6 mice) that were receptive to being injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells. The mice that were the control (untreated) died from 9-12 days after the injection from the tumour growth. The other group of mice were treated with Noni juice five times a day. The Noni juice was shown to significantly increase the life span of the treated mice (from 105%-123%) with 9 out of 22 mice surviving more than 50 days. This experiment was repeated and they concluded that Noni juice “seems to act indirectly by enhancing host immune system involving macrophages and/or lymphocytes”[3].

After the study on the Lewis lung tumours on mice a study was carried out on another tumour BALB/c in thymus cells in culture, it is suggested that the inhibition of Lewis lung tumours in mice may partly have been due to stimulation of the T-cell immune response[4].

A study conducted by Japanese researchers studied the effect of 500 extracts from Topical plants on the K-ras-NRK cell (a precursor to certain types of cancer). A compound called damnacthal found in Noni, it was found to inhibit ras function. Damnacthal has also been found to inhibit the Epstein-Barr virus (belongs to the herpes virus group the causative agent of glandular fever and implicated in hepatitis and certain cancers) early-antigen activation. They believe that this phytonutrient – damnacanthal encourages the genes of pre-cancerous cells to “believe” they are healthy cells thereby preventing prolonged multiplication of the cells. It may not eliminate cancer but may control and reduce the spread and growth of it[1],[5].

Another study tested the analgesic and sedative effects of extracts of Noni. Traditionally it was called “pain killer tree” in the Caribbean islands and “headache tree” in Asia. Noni has been shown to be non-toxic and it was found that on mice it showed a significant, dose related, central analgesic activity. It was concluded, “These findings validate the traditional analgesic properties of this plant”[1],[6].

Noni can help many ailments and has been used traditionally by many cultures. Noni is now becoming more accepted by health professionals and is backed by some very compelling research. To conclude these are some of the functions Noni has:

  • Noni helps cells regenerate and function more normally.
  • Noni may prevent development of various disorders and works optimally in conjunction with other antioxidants.
  • It is effective against fungus and parasites.
  • Noni is effective against several harmful bacteria.
  • It is a natural antiseptic.
  • Noni appear to retard tumour growth by stimulating the immune system.
  • It has an analgesic effect.
  • It arrests the growth of RAS cancerous cells when implanted1,2,3,4,5,6.

Caution

Not recommended if pregnant or lactating. Those on a low-potassium diet should avoid Noni. Can have a laxative affect, care should be taken when exceeding the recommended dose.

No other cautions or contraindications are known at time of writing, however as with all products, please seek advice from a health professional if you are taking any medication, suffer from a serious health condition or are under 12 years of age.

References

  • (1) Solomon N (1998) Nature’s amazing healer Noni. Woodland Publishing USA.
  • (2) Elkins R. Noni (Morinda citrifloria). 1997 Woodland Publishing USA.
  • (3) Hirazumi A, Furusawa E, Chou SC, Hokama Y. Anti-cancer activity of Morinda citrifloria on intraperitoneally implanted Lewis lung carcinoma syngenic mice. Proc. West. Pharmacol. Soc. 1994; 37: 145-146.
  • (4) Ganal CA, Hokama Y. The effect of noni fruit extract (Morinda citrifolia, Indian mulberry) on thymocytes of BALB/c mouse. FASEB J 1993; 7(4): A866.
  • (5) Hiramatsu T, Imoto M, Koyano K, Umezawa. Induction of normal phenotypes in RAS-transformed cells by damnacanthal from Morinda citrifolia. Cancer Letters 1993; 73: 161-166.
  • (6) Younos C, Rolland A, Fleurentin J, Lanhers M, Misslin R, Mortier Planta Medica 1990; 56: 430-434.

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